Complete guide to an uncontested divorce in 2021

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California made international headlines in 1970 when then-governor Ronald Reagan signed the passage of no-fault divorce for that state. Other states soon followed, and today, no-fault divorce is allowed in all states. This has created a new norm of lower-conflict, or uncontested divorce (which is legally different than no-fault). In fact, the vast majority of divorces are settled out of court, and are uncontested divorces.

What does “uncontested” mean in a divorce?

In most basic terms, uncontested divorces are those in which the spouses agree on all terms, and do not go to court to resolve them. Technically, you may have fought bitterly over various terms, either between the two of you, or accompanied by lawyers or a mediator, but by the time the divorce papers and settlement agreement are filed in court, it is a settled matter.

In contrast, in a contested divorce you go to trial to have a judge settle terms of the divorce.

Uncontested divorce can be synonymous with many other terms:

This is good news: Unlike years before, when a spouse had to prove good reason to divorce their spouse, or find legal fault with their husband or wife, and litigation was nearly always inevitable, today couples have the option to divorce amicably, quickly and affordably — and the vast majority do.

Here is what you need to know about filing an uncontested divorce:

How to get an uncontested divorce

If you and your spouse are generally in agreement that you both want the divorce, and what the terms of the divorce should be regarding the children, assets, and ongoing financial terms, you have a few choices:

  • Sit down at the kitchen table, hash out the details, sign the papers and file for your divorce yourselves in your local courthouse. Many couples in this camp also have an attorney look over the papers to make sure they are filled out properly and all major considerations are addressed. An online divorce papers service can be helpful.
  • Each of you hire your own attorney, and the four of your duke out a settlement agreement through phone calls, email and perhaps in-person meetings. The papers are signed and filed, and you are divorced.
  • You and your spouse work with a mediator to sort out the terms of a settlement. The mediator, an attorney or you can file the papers.

This is our guide to all the lingo and processes of divorce. You can also use this free divorce worksheet.

The road to divorce may not be linear. For example, you may start out at the kitchen table, but realize you can’t come to terms on your own, so hire a mediator to help settle matters. Or, perhaps one of you is all set on going to court, everyone lawyers up, but then you both realize that is expensive and stupid and you settle. Etc.

How to find a divorce lawyer or mediator that you’ll like and trust

Uncontested divorce with children: Can a divorce be uncontested with a child?

Uncontested divorces absolutely are possible and even advisable for the vast majority of couples with children who are separating.

Uncontested Divorce Guidance from r/Divorce

Why an uncontested divorce is best for your children

Less fighting over terms of your divorce means the pain of the process will be over quicker for the whole family. It also means that you are more likely to co-parent well, which is critical.

Leaving your spouse? Divorce checklists

Uncontested divorce steps: How to start the process online

1. Meet with spouse about dividing assets and child custody

Nearly all couples have some financial assets: real estate, retirement and investment accounts, checking and savings, vehicles — as well as debt. Learn more about what property is considered marital assets and the laws for dividing assets for each state in this post.

Couples should also agree to how to share time and expenses for the children, including any child support or alimony.

Equal and amicable co-parenting is best for children according to dozens of peer-reviewed scientific papers. It is also best for gender equality. My survey of 2,279 single moms found a direct correlation between time-sharing equality for separated and divorced parents, and single moms’ income and overall wellbeing. Also, child support compliance is higher when both parents are equally involved with the kids.

Close the pay gap? Get dads involved? 50/50 custody, no child support

Online parenting classes, including for divorce and court-ordered

2. Fill out uncontested divorce papers online for your state

Most states allow you to download, and sometimes file, your divorce papers online.

Find divorce papers for your state here:

AlabamaAlaska
ArizonaArkansas
CaliforniaColorado
ConnecticutDelaware
District of ColumbiaFlorida
GeorgiaHawaii
IdahoIllinois
IndianaIowa
KansasKentucky
LouisianaMaine
MarylandMassachusetts
MichiganMinnesota
MississippiMissouri
MontanaNebraska
NevadaNew Hampshire
New JerseyNew Mexico
New YorkNorth Carolina
North DakotaOhio
OklahomaOregon
PennsylvaniaRhode Island
South CarolinaSouth Dakota
TennesseeTexas
UtahVermont
VirginiaWashington
West VirginiaWisconsin
Wyoming

3. Have your uncontested divorce papers notarized and file them with your local courthouse

The good news is most divorcing couples can and do file their own divorce papers, which you can get for free at your local court house, and pay the local court fees — which are typically between $200 and $300, depending on where you live and a few other factors.

If you choose to have an attorney or mediator

When you should consider an uncontested divorce

Uncontested divorces are recommended when you and your spouse have most of the terms of your assets, child care and custody and ongoing financial arrangements. The two of you have come to a settlement, and while attorneys may help you sort out some details, your divorce does not need to go before a judge.

Pros of an uncontested divorce

There are many positives of uncontested divorce:

  • Much, much lower cost
  • Less stress
  • Quicker
  • You likely will have more control over your divorce and life after — opposed to being at the mercy of a judge, court dates, and any other professionals involved including attorneys, psychologists, guardian ad litems, forensic accountants, etc.
  • Less trauma for your children — and the whole family
  • Less conflict with your spouse during divorce is found to have better co-parenting long-term

Cons of an uncontested divorce

Some divorcing spouses want to make their soon-to-be ex’s life hell, and a contested divorce does that (though divorce negotiations are nearly always painful in varying degrees).

There are some instances when you may need to go to trial to finalize your divorce, and an uncontested divorce would make you vulnerable to abuse or put your children in real danger. This includes if your ex suffers from addiction, severe mental illness, there is risk they will abduct the children, some instances of financial abuse in which a trial may make fiscal sense, or high-asset couples who have complicated finances.

Unsure whether you should divorce? What to consider …

Signs your husband or wife is ready for divorce

Do I have to go to court for an uncontested divorce?

In some states, one spouse must first file the papers, have them served to the other spouse, who must respond through the courts . In some states, you must appear in court in person for the divorce to be finalized, while other states allow for this to happen remotely — including the online filing of divorce papers by the petitioner, or a third-party like an attorney.

How do I prepare for an uncontested divorce? What is part of an uncontested divorce checklist requirements?

Each state has its own protocol and requirements, but be prepared to address these uncontested divorce requirements:

  • General identification for each spouse: Name, date of birth, address, social security number, etc.
  • Proof of residence and length of residence in the state.
  • Some states require a waiting period or required separation time. Be prepared to prove this by way of lease records.
  • Agreement to terms of the divorce including:
    • Child time-sharing and co-parenting
    • Child support
    • Alimony
    • Division of assets, including retirement and savings funds, real estate and debt

Get a free divorce agreement agreement template here.

What every parent should ask for in a divorce

What happens at an uncontested divorce hearing?

An uncontested divorce hearing is typically sort and matter-of-fact. When you appear, you will present the signed settlement agreement and divorce papers.

The judge may ask you a few questions, but is most likely to address a few formalities, including that you feel the settlement is fair, that you did not agree to it under threat or influence, and that it was indeed you who signed the papers.

The judge will then declare s/he has granted your divorce, sign a written divorce decree, and let you know next steps, which may include waiting to receive copies of the signed decree by mail — again, this will vary by state and sometimes county.

The judge will not read your agreement, or make any judgement as to whether either of you got a good or raw deal.

What questions are asked in an uncontested divorce?

Each state is different, but expect to answer these questions in your divorce papers:

  • Names, addresses, date of birth for both spouses
  • Date of marriage
  • Any info on a separation, if required by your state
  • Names and birth dates of any children you have together
  • Terms of physical and legal custody
  • Child support terms, if any
  • Financial records
  • Shared property and debt

Estate, will and guardianship planning for single parents

How much does a simple, uncontested divorce cost?

If you collect the divorce papers yourself, do not hire an attorney, and and file yourself, you pay only the filing fees, which are typically between $200 and $300 depending on where you live.

How long does an uncontested divorce take?

The length of time from deciding to an uncontested divorce, to finalizing the divorce depend on various factors:

  • How quickly you can come to terms of settlement with your spouse.
  • State laws that may require a wait period or legal separation.
  • Backlog in the courts — which is common thanks to the COVID pandemic.

Affordable, fast and exam-free life insurance for single parents

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Alabama?

Alabama divorces take at least 30 days, starting from the day you file. On average, an uncontested divorce takes 6 to 10 weeks after filing.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Alaska?

Getting a divorce in Alaska will take at least 30 days after you have filed, due to a mandatory waiting period.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Arizona?

Arizona requires both spouses be residents for a minimum of 90 days before filing for divorce. Arizona requires couples filing for divorce adhere to a 60-day waiting period before the decree is eligible to be finalized.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Arkansas?

Arkansas has a 30-day waiting period for divorce, though it can take longer for your divorce to be finalized if the court has a backlog of cases on its docket.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in California?

California requires a six-month minimum waiting period after the defendant is served the initial divorce paper filings. However, the actual divorce can take longer.

Leaving your spouse? Divorce checklists

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Colorado?

Colorado has a mandatory 90-day waiting period for divorce. The 90-day waiting period begins on the date of the filing, if the filing was made jointly by both spouses. If the filing was made by just one spouse, then the 90-day waiting period begins the day that the non-filing spouse is served their papers.

That being said, most divorces in Colorado are finalized within 6 to 9 months.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Connecticut?

Connecticut has a mandatory 90-day waiting period required by law. This waiting period begins the date of the filing, if the filing was made jointly by both spouses. If the filing was made by one spouse, this waiting period will begin approximately 30 days after the filing (the “return date”).

In some instances, it is possible to waive this 90-day waiting period. Typically, this will require that you and your spouse agree on all issues (including alimony, child support, custody, and the division of property) before filing for divorce.

A backlog of cases in the court’s docket can significantly increase the amount of time that it takes to finalize your divorce.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Delaware?

In order to get a divorce in Delaware, you and your spouse must first have been legally separated for a minimum of 6 months. It is only after this separation has taken place that the courts will move forward with the divorce process. Once divorce proceedings have begun, an uncontested divorce can be finalized in as little as 2 to 3 weeks, depending on how busy the court’s schedule is.

The 6-month separation period can be waived, and divorce proceedings initiated immediately, if the divorce is being filed on grounds of misconduct (including physical, mental, or psychological abuse, adultery, or spousal desertion) so long as misconduct can be proven.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Florida?

An uncontested divorce in Florida can take as little as a few weeks, though more realistically, most Florida divorces are completed within six months. One of the spouses must be a Florida resident for at least six months.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Georgia?

Georgia has a mandatory 30-day waiting period. In cases where the divorce is filed jointly, this waiting period begins the day after the filing. In cases where the divorce is filed by one spouse, the waiting period begins the day after the other spouse is served with divorce papers.

Other factors, including the availability of a court date and the length of litigation, can increase how long it will take for the divorce to be finalized. That said, the average uncontested divorce in Georgia takes approximately 45 to 60 days.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Hawaii?

To divorce in Hawaii, one part has to have lived in the state for at least six months. There is no minimum wait or separation time, and typically divorcing couples do not have to appear in court in Hawaii if the case is uncontested. Expect one to three months to finalize an uncontested divorce.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Idaho?

Idaho has a mandatory 20-day waiting period after you file for divorce which begins the day after the divorce is filed (if filed jointly) or the day after the non-filing spouse is served with papers (if filed by just one spouse).

Other factors can also increase the length of time it takes to finalize your divorce. For example, if your divorce involves minor children, the court may put a 90-day hold on the case before it can be finalized.

Additionally, cases involving neglect, willful desertion, or alcoholism must be held for one year before a divorce can be finalized. Whether or not the court has a significant backlog of cases will also determine how quickly your case moves through.

All told, the average divorce in Idaho will take 30 to 90 days to finalize.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Illinois?

An uncontested divorce in Illinois can be finalized in as little as two to four weeks, depending on the court’s schedule. Illinois does not have a mandatory wait time for divorce.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Indiana?

Indiana has a 60-day mandatory waiting period that begins the day after the divorce has been filed. Most uncontested divorces in Indiana will be finalized within a few weeks after the waiting period has ended, depending on the court's backlog.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Iowa?

Iowa has a 90-day mandatory waiting period that begins the day after a divorce has been filed. In cases where only one spouse is filing for divorce, the waiting period begins the day after the non-filing spouse has been served. Under certain specific circumstances, the court may choose to waive or reduce the waiting period.

An uncontested divorce can be concluded relatively quickly depending on the court’s docket.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Kansas?

Kansas has a 60-day mandatory waiting period that begins the day after the divorce has been filed. In some emergency cases, including those that involve abuse, this mandatory waiting period may be waived or shortened by the court.

The typical uncontested divorce in Kansas can often be completed within 60 to 80 days after filing.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Kentucky?

To qualify to divorce in Kentucky, both parties must have resided in the state for at least 180 days and agree the marriage is “irretrievably broken,” with no possibility for reconciliation. For uncontested divorces for couples with children must wait 60 days from the initial filing for the divorce to be eligible for finalization. For couples that don’t have minor children, the 60 days can begin from the date of separation.

What is collaborative divorce and is it right for you?

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Louisiana?

In order to get divorced in Louisiana, you and your spouse must first have been separated (living apart) for a minimum of 180 days if you are married with no children, or 365 days if you are married with children. It’s only after this separation has taken place that the courts will move forward to finalize the divorce. You can file your divorce petition before or after this separation.

Once the minimum separation has taken place and the petition has been filed, an uncontested divorce can be completed in as little as a few weeks, depending on how busy the court's schedule is.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Maine?

Maine has a 60-day mandatory waiting period that begins once all of the required paperwork has been filed.

An uncontested divorce in Maine can be completed in as little as 60 to 90 days.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Maryland?

For an uncontested divorce, there is no mandatory separation period in Maryland divorce law. This means that so long as both spouses can come to an agreement on the terms of the divorce, you can file immediately and you can expect your divorce to be finalized within 90 days.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Massachusetts?

If the divorce is uncontested and both spouses file a joint petition for divorce, then the process will be much quicker. Upon filing, a court date will be issued, which is typically a few weeks out, depending on the court’s backlog. During the hearing, the judge will review the divorce agreement, and so long as it is accepted and approved by the judge, then the divorce will typically be granted. A waiting period of either 90 or 120 days (also called the “Nisi Period”) must then pass before the divorce becomes “absolute” or final.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Michigan?

For a divorce that doesn't involve minor children, Michigan has a mandatory 60-day waiting period. For a divorce that does involve minor children, the waiting period is increased to 6 months.

An uncontested divorce in Michigan can often be finalized within a few weeks of the waiting period concluding, depending on the court’s schedule.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Minnesota?

Unlike many states, Minnesota does not require a mandatory waiting period or separation period before a divorce will be granted. This means that the greatest factors in determining how long your divorce takes will be the court’s schedule.

An uncontested divorce will commonly be finalized within 30 to 90 days after filing, depending on the court’s schedule.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Mississippi?

Mississippi has a mandatory 60-day waiting period. This waiting period begins immediately after the paperwork is filed.

An uncontested divorce in Mississippi will typically be finalized within weeks of the waiting period having passed.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Missouri?

Once a divorce judgement is signed by a judge, the divorce becomes final after a 30-day cooling off period. Missouri requires at least one spouse live in Missouri for at least 180 days before filing for divorce.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Montana?

In order to get a divorce in Montana, you must demonstrate that there has been an irretrievable breakdown in the marriage. You can demonstrate this in one of two ways: Either by separating from your spouse for a minimum of 180 days before the filing, or by showing that there is serious marital discord which adversely affects the attitude of one or both spouses toward the marriage.

Once the petition is filed, most uncontested divorces will be finalized within 30 to 90 days depending on how busy the court’s schedule is.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Nebraska?

Nebraska has a 60-day mandatory waiting period for divorce. If a divorce petition was filed jointly by both spouses, then the waiting period begins immediately upon filing; if the divorce was filed by only one spouse, then this waiting period will begin 30 days after the non-filing spouse has been served.

After the waiting period has passed, most divorces in Nebraska will be finalized within 6 months. This will ultimately depend on the court’s schedule, as well as whether or not there are any disputes which must be settled in court. An uncontested divorce will typically be finalized much more quickly.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Nevada?

Unlike in many states, there is no mandatory waiting period between when you file for divorce and when the court will issue a decision.

For that reason, an uncontested divorce in which both spouses agree can be finalized in as little as two to three weeks, depending on the court’s schedule.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in New Hampshire?

In New Hampshire, unlike in many states, there is no required waiting period or separation period which must pass before you can file for divorce. For this reason, an uncontested divorce in New Hampshire can often be finalized within two to eight weeks, depending on the court’s schedule.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in New Jersey?

New Jersey has no minimum residency, separation or wait time requirement. If yours is an uncontested divorce, it could be completed within a month or two, but expect longer.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in New Mexico?

New Mexico has a 30-day waiting period that begins the day after the non-filing spouse has been served with divorce papers. The waiting period can be waived in cases that meet the following requirements:

  • Spouses have been living apart for at least 30 days
  • Both parties agree to having the waiting period ended
  • There are no minor children

All told, the average uncontested divorce in New Mexico can be finalized within 30 to 90 days depending on the court’s schedule.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in New York?

Uncontested divorces in New York can be resolved within an average of three to six months.

More about how to get divorced in New York.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in North Carolina?

In North Carolina, in order to file for divorce, you and your spouse must first have been separated for at least one year. The state defines being separated as living in different homes; you are not required to be legally separated in order for this time period to begin.

Once you and your spouse have been separated for at least a year, you may file for divorce. The non-filing spouse will have 30 days to respond, after they are served; this may be extended by a further 30 days if they request it.

After the 30-60 day response period has passed, an uncontested divorce can be granted in as little as 3-5 weeks depending on the court’s docket.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in North Dakota?

In North Dakota, there is no waiting mandatory separation period that must pass before a divorce can be filed. Once the divorce is filed, the non-filing spouse will have 20 days to respond to the complaint. After that time has passed, an uncontested divorce can be finalized in as little as 1 to 3 months, depending on the court’s schedule.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Ohio?

In Ohio, when spouses agree on all aspects of the divorce, they would file for a dissolution of marriage, which is roughly the equivalent of an “uncontested divorce” in other states. A dissolution may be granted in as little as 30 days after filing. The Ohio Supreme Court has issued guidelines stating that any dissolution should be completed within 90 days of being filed.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Oklahoma?

In Oklahoma, for cases that do not involve minor children, it’s possible to finalize an uncontested divorce in as little as 10 days after filing. For cases that do involve minor children, there is a mandatory 90-day waiting period that must pass before the courts will finalize the divorce. The courts can choose to waive this waiting period in some cases.

Uncontested divorces can and often do take much longer to complete.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Oregon?

In Oregon, the amount of time required to get a divorce will depend on whether the divorce petition is being filed by one spouse or both spouses. For cases filed by both spouses (co-petitioned) an uncontested divorce can often be finalized within 2 weeks. For cases where one spouse is filing, an uncontested divorce can often be finalized within 4 to 6 weeks of the other spouse being served with divorce papers.

There used to be a 90-day waiting period in Oregon, but the state recently did away with that particular requirement.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Pennsylvania?

In Pennsylvania, the timeframe for getting a divorce will depend on the type of divorce being sought. If you are seeking a mutual consent divorce, in which both spouses agree to the divorce, then there is a 90-day waiting period between when the divorce petition is filed and when the divorce can be finalized. Filing a “no-fault” divorce, on the other hand, will require that you and your spouse have lived apart for at least a year first.

An at-fault divorce does not have a mandatory waiting period, but typically takes much longer due to the need for a trial.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Rhode Island?

An uncontested divorce in Rhode Island can often be finalized in as little as 75 to 90 days after the filing. A contested divorce will naturally take much longer due to the litigation required.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in South Carolina?

In South Carolina, in order to file a no-fault divorce, you and your spouse have been living separate and apart for at least a year. Once this separation period has passed and you file for divorce (typically uncontested) it can be finalized in as little as 3 months.

If you are filing for an at-fault divorce, then you do not need to have lived separately from your spouse. Upon filing, the non-filing spouse will have 30 days after being served to respond to the complaint. Once this response period has passed, a trial date will typically be set for approximately 90 days out, depending on the court’s schedule.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in South Dakota?

Divorce in South Dakota requires a waiting period of 60 days after the serving of the summons and complaint before you and your attorney can finalize the divorce.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Tennessee?

In Tennessee, there is a mandatory waiting period of 60 days (for cases without children) or 90 days (for cases with children) which must pass before a divorce can be finalized. This waiting period (also called a “cooling off” period in the state) begins the day after paperwork has been filed. This means that the quickest an uncontested divorce can be finalized in Tennessee is approximately 2-3 months after filing.

On average, an uncontested divorce in Tennessee will take a year or more to complete.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Texas?

At least 60 days, starting the day after your petition gets filed. However, if the 60th day is on a weekend or a holiday, the 60th day is considered to be the next business day.

Depending on how backed-up your county court is, the divorce could actually be completed on that 60th day (or the next business day). It could take longer in busier county court systems.

Two exceptions to the 60-day rule exist:

  • There’s an active order of protection or a magistrate’s order for protection against your spouse due to domestic violence.
  • Your spouse has either been convicted of (or received deferred adjudication for) a crime involving domestic violence.
  • In both these cases the 60-day period is set aside.

How long does it take to get a divorce if you are legally separated?

There’s no such thing as legal separation in Texas. Basically, you’re married until you’re not married, i.e., until the divorce is finalized.

More about how to divorce in Texas.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Utah?

Once you file for divorce in Utah, your spouse is entitled to a response period of 21 days (if they were served in the state) or 30 days (if they were served outside of the state). Once this response period has ended, there is a mandatory 30 day waiting period before the divorce will be finalized. The courts can, in some cases, waive this waiting period.

This means that in total it will take a minimum of 51 to 60 days after filing for an uncontested divorce to be complete. It can take longer if the court’s schedule is backed up, or if you and your spouse are not in agreement on certain issues.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Vermont?

In order to get divorced in Vermont, you and your spouse must have lived “separate and apart” for at least 6 months. This does not mean that you must be living in separate residences; something as simple as sleeping in separate beds will qualify. This separation period can take place before you’ve filed for divorce, or after.

If your divorce involves minor children, there is a mandatory six-month waiting period that must pass after you have filed for divorce. This waiting period cannot be waived, but it can take place during the same time as the separation period mentioned above.

Finally, after the divorce order has been granted, it does not become final until a further 90-day waiting period (called the “nisi period”) passes. During the nisi period, you cannot remarry. You and your spouse can waive the nisi period so long as you are both in agreement.

The typical uncontested divorce in Vermont that doesn’t involve children can be completed within 6 months. Cases that do involve children will likely take longer, up to a year or more.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Virginia?

In Virginia, the non-custodial parent typically pays child support to the custodial parent. If custody is shared, then the parent who spends less parenting time with the child will typically be responsible.

Virginia's child support calculator uses an income shares model to determine payments owed. This formula factors in both parents’ incomes, as well as their custody arrangement, to calculate payment levels. The costs of childcare, health care, and insurance are also split proportionally between both parents.

Child support ends in Virginia when the child turns 19 years old or graduates from high school, whichever occurs first.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Washington?

In Washington state, there is a 90-day waiting period which begins as soon as the divorce papers have been served to the non-filing spouse. This means that at a minimum it will take 90 days to finalize your divorce. It can take longer depending on the court’s schedule, and especially if you and your spouse do not agree on key issues.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in West Virginia?

In West Virginia, you can file for an uncontested divorce either by alleging irreconcilable differences or that you and your spouse have been living separate and apart for at least 1 year. Once you file and serve your spouse, a minimum of 20 days must pass before the court can finalize your divorce. It can take longer than 20 days depending on the court’s schedule.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Wisconsin?

In Wisconsin, there is a mandatory 120-day waiting period that begins once the non-filing spouse has been served with divorce papers. This waiting period must pass before the divorce can be finalized. Most divorces in the state can be finalized within 6 months to a year, depending on the court’s schedule and whether or not you and your spouse agree on the terms of the divorce.

How long does it take to get an uncontested divorce in Wyoming?

In Wyoming, after you file for divorce you must wait a minimum of 20 days before the divorce can be finalized. Most uncontested divorces can be completed within 30 to 60 days in the state.

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Wealthysinglemommy.com founder Emma Johnson is an award-winning business journalist, activist, author and expert. A former Associated Press reporter and MSN Money columnist, Emma has appeared on CNBC, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, NPR, TIME, The Doctors, Elle, O, The Oprah Magazine. Winner of Parents magazine’s “Best of the Web” and a New York Observer “Most Eligible New Yorker," her #1 bestseller, The Kickass Single Mom (Penguin), was a New York Post Must Read. As an expert on divorce and gender, Emma presented at the United Nations Summit for Gender Equality and multiple state legislature hearings. More about Emma's credentials.

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