How to become a coder (high paying and you can work from home)

learn how to code

 

Whether they go by the title coder, developer, software engineer, hacker, or programmer, those who can help create computer programs, apps, sites or systems are in hot demand — and you can earn a high salary writing code without a formal education.

Bloomberg calls the software development job market “the highest demand market in 20 years,” with the unemployment rate in this sector at half of the unemployment rate overall.

The newswire writes:

“While companies are writing bigger checks, they are also adopting new strategies to find engineers for an economy where software is penetrating even mundane processes. Companies are focusing more on training, sourcing new talent through apprenticeships, and looking at atypical pools of candidates who have transferable skills.”

As every single vertical of our professional and personal lives is moving online — to phone apps and functions, voice activated artificial intelligence like Alexa and Google Voice, manufacturing and retail systems — anything involving a screen and digital communication.

While computers are replacing humans in many ways, someone must do the back-end work that creates and runs that technology. Programmers are the professionals that create software that runs our phones, computers, apps, websites, and systems.

If you have technology skills already or you simply want to learn, a career in coding and computer technology could be a safe bet. Looking for a job that pays well and you can do from home? Keep reading to find out what coders do, how well this job pays, and how to get started in this growing field.

What kind of tasks do coders/programmers do?

We already mentioned how coders use source code to get computers to do what they want using their own language. However, the tasks involved in speaking with computers is more complex than that.

Tasks can also vary widely depending on the type of work a coder does most. A coder who works for a computer programming firm may work on a specific project for years, for example. A self-employed coder may instead focus on helping a startup build an app.

If you plan to work as a self-employed coder who operates their business from home, you will likely want to focus on code used to build websites, including HTML and CSS. Learning to understand and use these languages can go a long way toward helping you secure clients who need this type of help, and you can learn a lot of these skills on your own.

Still, coders from all industries perform many of the same tasks no matter what kind of work they do. The main workplace tasks of coders include:

  • Use computer languages to build websites and applications
  • Use computer languages to help clients with front-end and back-end development of their websites and programs
  • Write computer programs in a variety of languages including Java and C++
  • Update existing programs per client or employer specifications
  • Create and test new code for various projects

Keep in mind that this list is not all-inclusive. Coders who are self-employed and working from home may find themselves taking on additional tasks such as marketing their business. Work-at-home coders also need to do their own bookkeeping (or hire it out) and communicate with their clients directly.

The good news is, coding is mostly solitary work. Whether you get a coding job you can do from home, work as a self-employed coder, or pick up a full-time job in a physical office, you won’t have to interact with people all day long. Most coders work independently on their projects once they know what their clients or employers want, which can be a huge plus if you’re not huge on working in teams (right here — that is why I for years I have written at home, all by my lonesome — and loved it!).

What skills do you need to be a programmer?

This may seem obvious, but the main skill you need to become a coder, developer or programmer is a broad understanding of at least a few of the most popular computer languages.

You don’t need to become an expert on every language out there since technology is always changing, and new source code is created all the time, but you need to be proficient in at least a few that are used frequently in your area of coding work.

It also helps to have a general curiosity about technology and its applications. You don’t need to be obsessed with computers, but you need to feel comfortable working with one for the bulk of your workday.

Get the skills you need >>

Additional skills you’ll need include:

  • Problem-solving skills that allow you to troubleshoot and solve problems on your own
  • Self-reliance and discipline since you’ll mostly be working alone
  • Logic that allows you to assess and understand computer languages that may seem complex or confusing to others
  • Attention to detail since computer languages must be correct to work how you want them to
  • Patience to deal with numerous tedious and lengthy processes, especially since coding can be a painfully slow task on its own
  • An excellent memory since you’ll need to pull all sorts of information from the depths of your mind
  • Communication skills that allow you to effectively talk to clients and employers to gain insight into their needs

While some coders work for computer programming and design firms, others work in industries such as finance and manufacturing. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) notes that 5% of computer programmers are self-employed. Because so many businesses need the help of coders, professionals who work in this field are not limited to a specific industry.

How much do coders/programmers earn?

Salaries for coders can vary a lot depending on their level of skill and the type of jobs they take on. However, the fact that technology continues to take hold of our lives means that these workers are often paid handsomely for their knowledge and expertise.

Also, keep in mind that experts in some computer languages can earn a lot more than others. According to this Medium article by ChallengeRocket, a tech recruiting firm, a senior Java developer can earn between $74,000 and $130,000 since that particular computer language is in high demand. An Objective-C specialist eans $108,000 to $112,000. An expert in Python could expect to earn $105,000 or more, but someone who mostly works with SQL may top out at around $70,000.

The lesson here? Become an expert in the coding languages that pay the most!

This sounds like a lot of money either way, but there are many factors that go into those salaries, ranging from how efficient you are to the coding languages you know, your experience, and even where you live. Coders in coastal cities and state capitals may earn more than rural coders due to an increase in demand for their skills as well as the higher cost of living in those areas, for example.

Also, note that self-employed coders could earn a lot more — or a lot less — depending on the type of work they do and the amount of work they take on. If you can fill your work calendar with clients and focus on one task such as building websites, you could earn a nearly unlimited income.

At the end of the day, it’s a great time to become a coder since the demand for computer skills only seems to increase each year. The BLS notes that jobs with computers will increase 13% during the decade the ends in 2026, and that’s twice the pace of all other jobs combined.

Programming jobs>>

Pros and cons of being a coder/programmer

Becoming a coder is a smart move if you love computers and working alone, but that doesn’t mean this job is perfect. Some of the main pros and cons of coding work include:

Advantages of working as a coder:

  • You can build your own business and work at home
  • Coders earn excellent wages for their skills and expertise
  • Coding jobs should be in demand for decades to come
  • You may not need a college degree to work as a coder

Disadvantages of working as a coder:

  • You will do almost all your work on a computer and by yourself (could be a pro or a con)
  • Technology is always changing and adapting, so you need to be a lifetime learner
  • You may earn less if you only become familiar with source code that isn’t in high demand

4 steps to becoming a coder without a college degree

If you want to become a coder, there are two main avenues to get you there. You can either earn a bachelor’s degree in computer science or a related field, or you can take steps to learn some basic computer languages and coding skills from home.

The fastest way to become a coder is to focus on web development since this is one area that is bursting with potential. Pretty much every business needs a website these days, right? With a solid background in coding and some basic experience, you can begin providing coding services in your area or online.

Steps to building a coding career include:

  • Step 1: Take basic coding courses online. The good news about coding education is that all kinds of colleges and organizations offer free resources you can access online. You can take an introductory computer science course for free through Harvard’s edX, for example. And actually, Harvard offers all kinds of free online courses in technology such as data science, Python, and JavaScript. You can also take programming courses through Simplilearn .
  • Step 2: Learn by doing. Spending time figuring out computer languages such as HTML and CSS on your own. Practice makes perfect, and that you’ll learn a lot by making your own mistakes and figuring out how to fix them. You’ll also want to learn how to use JavaScript for front-end web development, and a language such as PHP for back-end development. Remember that you can take free courses in these languages, but the best way to learn to use them is through experimentation on your own. In the end, employers are looking for proven skills more than a degree or certificate.
  • Step 3: Build a few websites or on your own. Take the time to visualize, create, and build your own websites or apps. Try and fail, then try again. The best way to gain the experience you need is to try and fail on your own until you finally succeed.
  • Step 4: Look for new clients, either paid or pro bono. Once you have some products that showcase your own work, offer your coding services for free at first so you can get some experience under your belt. Find potential clients online through websites like Fiverr.com and Upwork.com, or by asking people you know who might need help.

Where to find coding jobs

Remember how we said coders were in demand? They are, and you should find work much easier as a result.  Here are some of the best places to search for your first coding gig:

  • Check out job boards such as Indeed.com and CareerBuilder. Both feature an ever-changing roster of entry-level and advanced coding positions, some of which are seeking remote workers.
  • Create a profile on Fiverr.com and/or Upwork.com. Use the platform to find coding work for individuals and businesses.
  • Create a profile on FlexJobs.com. This website connects individuals seeking remote work with companies who need coders and other computer professionals.
  • Update your LinkedIn profile to note your renewed focus on coding. You want to make sure your profile shows up in searches if someone is looking for a coder in your area.

Coding jobs >>

What is the difference between a coder / programmer / developer / software engineer / hacker?

Depends on who you ask. These terms can all be interchangeable, according to some. Others argue there is a difference in skill level and expertise (see below). However, all these titles can all be referred to as a programmer. Roughly, it goes like this:

Coders

Coders are the least experienced level of programmers and are usually beginners skilled in just one coding language. Typically, a developer or programmer (see below!) creates the code, and assigns the task of code writing to a coder. Some people are offended by the term “coder” and prefer “junior developer or “junior programmer.”

Hacker

A hacker is someone who creates something new using code. This person is also a programmer, but not all programmers are hackers. Hackers are considered more innovative and creative than a developer.

Programmers and developers

The titles “programmer” and “developer” are often used interchangeably and are more experienced than coders — typically capable of writing error-free code in a minimum of two to three coding languages.

Programmers and developers often oversee a software development project from start to finish, and are held responsible for the design and project management of developing an application.

A developer tends to be formally educated in computer science or engineering, whereas the other job titles may not require any formal education at all — but proof of competence.

Software Engineers

Software engineers rank higher than programmers and developers, and are typically fluent in at least three programming languages and are responsible for high-level design and architecture of a product.

Engineers oversee the programmers and developers, who implement the more detailed aspects of the design. A software engineer is often responsible for setting up servers, tackling security, networking, hardware devices, etc.

There are many, many computer languages to work with and understand. For example, coders need to have a grasp on programming languages you have probably heard of such as Java, Python, JavaScript, and SQL, PHP, C++ and with other languages that are more obscure. With so many languages in use, coders need comfortable with the demand to stay current on tech and be constantly learning.

Software analyst

Someone assigned to document, dissect, and understand the need for the software. Usually, someone working directly with users to qualify and quantify their needs, but is not usually adept enough to know how to solve it.  Mostly the folks who can communicate well, but lack the technical capabilities to deliver.

Architect / Designer

Someone who has strong development experience. They also have conceptual skills to see the larger picture of how the software fits into the company’s larger systems and goals.

Heavily involved in the ‘why’ and not just the ‘how’. A software architect/designer has strong leadership, communication and management skills. This rule often combines the Developer and Analyst skill sets, and also has a lot of experience in the trenches with programming/coding. Get started with your coding career today

Related posts:

Flexjobs Review: Does this site really find high-paying work-at-home jobs?

How to become a virtual assistant 

How to become childcare provider(or nanny)

How to become a social media manager

How to become a graphic designer

How to become a corporate event planner

How to become a clinical research coordinator

How to become a bookkeeper

 


Some of the links in this and other posts generate a commission. I never recommend products that I don’t truly believe in. Seriously – I get asked to write about stuff all the time and turn down hard cash if I’m not feeling it.


holly johnson money writer
Holly Johnson

Holly Johnson is a financial expert, award-winning writer, and Indiana mother of two who is obsessed with frugality, budgeting and travel. Her personal finance articles have been published in the U. S. News, Wall Street Journal, Fox Business, and Life Hacker. Holly is founder of of the family finance resource, ClubThrifty.com, and is the co-author of Zero Down Your Debt: Reclaim Your Income and Build a Life You’ll Love. Learn more about Holly here.

About Holly Johnson

Holly Johnson is a financial expert, award-winning writer, and Indiana mother of two who is obsessed with frugality, budgeting and travel. Her personal finance articles have been published in the U. S. News, Wall Street Journal, Fox Business, and Life Hacker. Holly is founder of of the family finance resource, ClubThrifty.com, and is the co-author of Zero Down Your Debt: Reclaim Your Income and Build a Life You’ll Love. Learn more about Holly here.

Leave a Comment