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Coin machines and more: 9 ways to cash in coins in 2022

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If you have lots of loose change lying around, you can convert it into spendable cash. 

While you can search for “coin-counting machines near me” or “Coinstar near me,” there are other places to turn your quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies into cash, including:  

Keep reading to learn where and how you can cash in your coins:

Banks

When you want to turn in “coins for cash near me,” banks are the most obvious place to do it. Most banks, including Bank of America, will turn coins into cash as long as they’re rolled in designated coin wrappers. Note that partial rolls may not be accepted. 

Before heading to any bank to cash in coins, it’s a smart (and potentially time-saving) idea to call ahead to make sure the bank accepts rolled coins and to see if they charge any fees, especially if you don’t have an account with the bank. 

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What banks have free coin-counting machines?

Although coin-counting machines were once a fixture in many banks, that’s not the case anymore. Banks like Capital One, TD Bank, and PNC Bank pulled the plug years ago on their coin-counting machines, citing reasons such as declining customer demand, inaccuracies, and malfunctions. 

The following list is not exhaustive, but it includes a few banks in the U.S. that still have coin-counting machines. Keep in mind that if you aren’t an account holder at a bank but want to use its coin-counting machine, there’s a good chance you will have to pay a fee:

  • Fidelity Bank: Nearly all Fidelity Bank branches have coin-counting machines in their lobbies. Bank customers can cash in their coins for free, but non-bank members may have to pay a fee (depending on the branch). You can also cash in coins with a bank employee or redeem them for a Visa gift card. However, the Visa gift card option will incur a $2.50 fee. 
  • JBT Bank: Every JBT branch has self-service coin-counting machines that are fee-free for JBT customers. Non-customers might have to pay a fee. 
  • Manasquan Bank: Manasquan customers can cash in their coins for free. However, those who don’t bank there will incur a 15% redemption fee. 
  • Fifth Third Bank: Some Fifth Third branches offer loose coin exchange. Contact a branch to find out if the service is available and if any fees apply. 

Coinstar

Coinstar has thousands of coin-counting kiosks across the globe, including those at U.S. retailers, grocery stores, and some credit unions. If you’re wondering, “Where can I find a Coinstar machine near me?” you can use Coinstar’s kiosk finder. Enter a street address or ZIP code to locate the machines nearby. 

Does Coinstar have a limit?

Coinstar has a limit of $3,000 per coin-counting session. Call Coinstar customer service at 800-928-2274 if you think the coins you’d like to cash in will exceed the limit. Coinstar may be able to provide you with special assistance. 

What percentage does Coinstar take?

Coinstar charges an 11.9% coin-processing fee. So if you cash in $100 worth of coins, you’ll pay a fee of $11.90, leaving you with $88.10. However, fees may vary by Coinstar kiosk location. 

How do I avoid Coinstar fees?

You can avoid Coinstar fees by opting for an eGift card instead of cash. Coinstar offers eGift cards from the following stores and restaurants for the following minimum and maximum amounts:

  • AMC: $10-$100
  • Amazon.com: $5-$1,000
  • Apple: $10-$500
  • Applebee’s: $5-$500
  • Cabela’s: $5-$500
  • Chili’s: $5-$100
  • Domino’s: $5-$100
  • DoorDash: $15-$200
  • GameStop: $5-$500
  • GAP: $10-$500
  • Hotels.com: $10-$500
  • IHOP: $5-$200
  • Lowe’s: $5-$1,000
  • Nike: $5-$500
  • Outback Steakhouse: $5-$500
  • ROBLOX: $5-$500
  • Razer Gold: $10-$500
  • Red Robin: $5-$150
  • Southwest: $25-$500
  • Starbucks: $5-$500
  • Steam: $5-$250
  • Texas Roadhouse: $5-$100
  • The Home Depot: $3-$2,000

Not all Coinstar kiosks offer the full suite of eGift cards to choose from; options will vary depending on kiosk location. 

To find out which kiosks stock the eGift card you’re looking for, visit Coinstar’s eGift Card website, locate the eGift card you want and click “Find a Kiosk.”

Your browser will redirect you to the “Find a Kiosk” webpage and automatically add the name of the gift card you’re seeking to the search filter. All you have to do is enter the street address or ZIP to begin searching. 

Credit unions

If you’re not up for cashing in your coins at a Coinstar kiosk for the almost 12% fee, you’ll be interested in other “coins to cash near me” options.

You might be able to cash in your coins at a credit union with a teller. Some credit unions might also have self-service coin-counting machines that you can use to count your change and exchange it for cash. 

Depending on the credit union’s policies, however, you might have to pay a fee — especially if you aren’t a member. Here’s a list of some credit unions that offer coin-counting machines and their respective fees.

  • ACCESS Federal Credit Union: Free coin-counting services are provided for non-business members at the following branches: Camden, Clinton, Oneida, and Rome. Business members and non-members who want to use the service will incur a small fee. 
  • American Heritage Credit Union: Use of the coin-counting machine is free for all members. Non-members may incur a fee.
  • Hershey Federal Credit Union: The credit union’s Hershey office has a self-service coin-counting machine that’s free for members. Non-members will have to pay a 5% fee. 
  • Mission Federal Credit Union: Most branches have coin-counting machines. Members can cash in up to $200 per month worth of coins or up to $1,000 per year using the teller line or coin machine. Coin counting in excess of the stated limits will incur an 11% fee. 
  • NASA Federal Credit Union: Coin-counting machines are available at NASA Federal Credit Union’s Annapolis, Arlington, Bowie, Collington, Columbia, Falls Church, Greenbelt, Oak Hall, and Rockville branches. Non-members who use the machines will incur a 6% fee. 

Grocery stores

The coin-counting machines you’ll find in grocery stores are often Coinstar kiosks. Here’s a list of some of the grocery stores that are known to have Coinstar machines.

However, you’ll want to use Coinstar’s “Find a Kiosk” page to confirm if a particular grocery store in your area actually has a machine. 

  • Harris Teeter
  • Food Lion 
  • Albertson’s
  • Kroger
  • Safeway
  • WinCo
  • Dillion Food Stores
  • Food Maxx
  • Cub Foods
  • Meijer
  • ShopRite
  • Shop & Stop

Walmart

With 4,735 stores across the United States, Walmart is another location where you can find coin-counting machines — specifically those owned by Coinstar. Visit Coinstar’s “Find a kiosk” webpage to find out if a Walmart near you has a machine. 

QuickTrip

QuickTrip has more than 900 stores in 14 states. According to QuikTrip’s media consultant, Aisha Jefferson-Smith, QuickTrip stores do exchange coins for cash without a fee.

One tip Jefferson-Smith gave was that customers should exercise patience if they bring in their coins to a QuickTrip location. 

Depending on how busy the location is, the attendant may ask the customer to step aside until the attendant can devote the time needed to accurately count the loose coins and exchange them for the cash value. 

Retailers with self-checkout stations that accept coins

Another way you can cash in coins is at self-checkout stations that accept coins. Granted, you won’t receive cash back (unless you overpay), but it’s still a way to get 100% of the value from the coins you have piling up at home. 

Here’s a list of some retailers that have self-checkout stations, but you’ll have to check for yourself which stations accept coins. 

  • Target
  • Walmart
  • Dollar General
  • Kroger
  • Costco
  • Albertson’s

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FAQs about cashing in coins

Where can I cash in coins for free?

You can cash in coins at some banks and credit unions for free — especially if you have an account. 

If you are OK with being paid in gift cards, you can also cash in coins for free at Coinstar and other coin machines.

What’s the best place to cash in coins?

If you’re interested in getting cash back for your coins, the best place is often a financial institution where you hold an account, such as your bank or credit union. Unlike Coinstar, banks and credit unions often do not charge their customers fees for this service. 

While you’re cashing in on the loose change around your house, it’s a good time to see if you have any gold and silver jewelry lying around that you no longer wear. 

We recommend selling jewelry — including bracelets, gold chains, earrings, and bracelets — to CashforGoldUSA, a top online metals buyer with an A+ Better Business Bureau rating and highest-price guarantee.

They also accept gold and silver in all forms, including gold bullion, gold scrap, dental gold, gold coins, silver coins, silver flatware, sterling silver, and more.

Cash in on your unwanted gold and silver items with CashforGoldUSA.com >>

Plus, check out these other posts for more ways to make quick money:

Does Coinstar have a limit?

Coinstar has a limit of $3,000 per coin-counting session. 

What percentage does Coinstar take?

Coinstar charges an 11.9% coin-processing fee. So if you cash in $100 worth of coins, you’ll pay a fee of $11.90, leaving you with $88.10. However, fees may vary by Coinstar kiosk location.

Where can I cash in coins for free?

You can cash in coins at some banks and credit unions for free — especially if you have an account.

What’s the best place to cash in coins?

If you’re interested in getting cash back for your coins, the best place is often a financial institution where you hold an account, such as your bank or credit union. Unlike Coinstar, banks and credit unions often do not charge their customers fees for this service.

Cynthia Measom is a personal finance and business writer with 15 years of experience. Whether it's getting a raise, creating a sustainable budget, choosing the right credit card or taking steps to retire earlier, she enjoys helping people learn how to succeed. She believes everyone should go beyond the money mindset of "survive" and get to a place where they can actually thrive. Her articles have been featured in GOBankingRates, Yahoo Finance, MSN, Chron, INSIDER and AOL Finance. Cynthia holds a BA in English from the University of Texas.

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